Digital Formalism conference / Vienna / January 14-16

Lev Manovich will present visualizations of patterns in two films by Dziga Vertov produced in collaboration with Digital Formalism project (Vienna) at the international conference Digital Formalism / Dziga Vertov. "Method left home" (January 12-14, Vienna)

The visualizations are being published on a new DVD edition of Vertov's "The Eleventh Year" and "A Sixth Part of the World" which will be presented at the conference. The DVD features new soundtracks for the films composed by Michael Nyman.

Visualizations set on Flickr


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Digital Formalism / Dziga Vertov. "Method left home."

Jan 14-16, 2010, Vienna, Austria
Venues: The Austrian Film Museum and University of Vienna (Aula, Campus AAKH)

"Method has left home and started a life of its own," writes Russian formalist Viktor Shklovsky in his 'epistolary novel' Zoo or letters not about love (Berlin, 1923). The conference Digital Formalism / Dziga Vertov. "Method Has Left Home." marks the end of a three-year research project that sailed under this very flag: that formalism has started a new life in the digital age and, vice versa, that the digital claims the legacy of formalist paradigms.

In confronting Vertov’s method of film making with the procedures of current computing tools, the final project conference provokes new perspectives in the area of film scholarship, introducing digital tools for media archivists and generating another level for cultural players to reflect upon their productions. At last, the project’s findings leave their original habitat to continue life in other creative environments.

About the project:
The conference represents the final event of the research project Digital Formalism: The Vienna Vertov Collection (2007 - 2010), funded by WWTF (Vienna Science and Technology Fund). The aim of this interdisciplinary cooperation between TFM - Department of Theatre, Film and Media Studies at Vienna University, the Austrian Film Museum and the Institute of Software Engineering and Interactive Systems at Vienna University of Technology was to expand film formalism historically and theoretically, open up archival Vertov material for the general public and develop novel methods and computer-based tools for formal film analysis. The researchers focused on the oeuvre of the Soviet avant-garde filmmaker Dziga Vertov (1896-1954), confronting ‘traditional’ perception-based with computer-aided methods of film analysis in order to explore the typical ‘Vertovian’ devices, unravelling the complex structures of his films.

DVD-presentation:
Besides scholarly papers, a brand-new DVD edition of "The Eleventh Year" and "A Sixth Part of the World" will be presented at the conference - and international media scholars will expand the scope of the project findings further.

Conference participants:
John MacKay (Yale University), Annette Michelson (New York University), Alexander Deriabin (Moscow), Barbara Wurm (Basel/Berlin/Vienna), Julia Kursell (Berlin), Vera Kropf (Vienna University), Michael Loebenstein (Vienna), Adelheid Heftberger (Vienna), Georg Wasner (Vienna), Stavros Alifragkis (Cambridge University), Ute Holl (University of Basel), Matthias Zeppelzauer (TU Vienna), Dalibor Mitrovic (TU Vienna), Maia Zaharieva (TU Vienna), Wolfgang Beilenhoff (Weimar/Bochum), Thomas Tode (Hamburg)

The Computational Turn / March 9, 2010

The forthcoming workshop on The Computational Turn in humanities which will address many of themes central to Cultural Analytics paradigm.



CFP: The Computational Turn

SWANSEA UNIVERSITY
9TH MARCH 2010

Keynote: N. Katherine Hayles (Professor of Literature at Duke University).
Keynote: Lev Manovich (Professor, Visual Arts Department, UCSD).

The application of new computational techniques and visualisation technologies in the Arts & Humanities are resulting in new approaches and methodologies for the study of traditional and new corpora of Arts and Humanities materials. This new 'computational turn' takes the methods and techniques from computer science to create new ways of distant and close readings of texts (e.g. Moretti). This one-day workshop aims to discuss the implications and applications of what Lev Manovich has called 'Cultural Analytics' and the question of finding patterns using algorthmic techniques. Some of the most startling approaches transform understandings of texts by use of network analysis (e.g. graph theory), database/XML encodings (which flatten structures), or merely provide new quantitative techniques for looking at various media forms, such as media and film, and (re)presenting them visually, aurally or haptically. Within this field there are important debates about the contrast between narrative against database techniques, pattern-matching versus hermeneutic reading, and the statistical paradigm (using a sample) versus the data mining paradigm. Additionally, new forms of collaboration within the Arts and Humanities are emerging which use team-based approaches as opposed to the traditional lone-scholar. This requires the ability to create and manage modular Arts and Humanities research teams through the organisational structures provided by technology and digital communications (e.g. Big Humanities), together with techniques for collaborating in an interdisciplinary way with other disciplines such as computer science (e.g. hard interdisciplinarity versus soft interdisciplinarity).

Papers are encouraged in the following areas:

- Distant versus Close Reading
- Database Structure versus Argument
- Data mining/Text mining/Patterns
- Pattern as a new epistemological object
- Hermeneutics and the Data Stream
- Geospatial techniques
- Big Humanities
- Digital Humanities versus Traditional Humanities
- Tool Building
- Free Culture/Open Source Arts and Humanities
- Collaboration, Assemblages and Alliances
- Language and Code (software studies)
- Information visualization in the Humanities
- Philosophical and theoretical reflections on the computational turn

+ Participation Requirements +

Workshop participants are requested to submit a position paper (approx. 2000-5000 words) about the computational turn in Arts and Humanities, philosophical/theoretical reflections on the computational turn, research focus or research questions related to computational approaches, proposals for academic practice with algorithmic/visualisation techniques, proposals for new research methods with regard to Arts and Humanities or specific case studies (if applicable) and findings to date. Position papers will be published in a workshop PDF and website for discussion and some of the participants will be invited to present their paper at the workshop.

Deadline for Position papers: February 10, 2010
Submit papers to: http://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=tct2010

Workshop funded by The Callaghan Centre for the Study of Conflict, Power, Empire, Swansea University. The Research Institute in the Arts and Humanities (RIAH) at Swansea University.

+ References +

Clement, Tanya E. (2008) ‘A thing not beginning and not ending’: using digital tools to distant-read Gertrude Stein’s The Making of Americans. Literary and Linguistic Computing. 23.3 (2008): 361.

Clement, Tanya, Steger, Sara, Unsworth, John, Uszkalo, Kirsten (2008) How Not to Read a Million Books. Retrieved 10/11/09 from http://www3.isrl.illinois.edu/~unsworth/hownot2read.html

Council on Library and Information Resources and The National Endowment for the Humanities (2009) Working Together or Apart: Promoting the Next Generation of Digital Scholarship. Retrieved 10/11/09 from http://www.clir.org/pubs/reports/pub145/pub145.pdf

Hayles, N. Katherine (2009) RFID: Human Agency and Meaning in Information-Intensive Environments. Theory, Culture and Society 26.2/3 (2009): 1-24.

Hayles, N. Katherine (2009) How We Think: The Transforming Power of Digital Technologies. Retrieved 10/11/09 from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/27680

Kittler, Fredrich (1997) Literature, Media, Information Systems. London: Routledge.

Krakauer, David C. (2007) The Quest for Patterns in Meta-History. Santa Fe Institute Bulletin. Winter 2007. Retrieved 10/11/09 from http://www.intelros.ru/pdf/SFI_Bulletin/Quest.pdf

Latour, Bruno (2007) Reassembling the Social. London: Oxford University Press.

Manovich, Lev (2002) The Language of New Media. MIT Press.

Manovich, Lev (2007) White paper: Cultural Analytics: Analysis and Visualizations of Large Cultural Data Sets, May 2007. Retrieved 10/11/09 from http://softwarestudies.com/cultural_analytics/cultural_analytics_2008.doc

McLemee, Scott (2006) Literature to Infinity. Inside Higher Ed. Retrieved 10/11/09 from http://www.insidehighered.com/views/mclemee/mclemee193

Moretti, Franco (2005) Graphs, Maps, Trees: Abstract Models for a Literary History. London: Verso.

Robinson, Peter (2006) Electronic Textual Editing: The Canterbury Tales and other Medieval Texts. Electronic Textual Editing. Modern Language Association of America. Retrieved 10/11/09 from http://www.tei-c.org/About/Archive_new/ETE/Preview/robinson.xml

Schreibman, Susan, Siemens, Ray & Unsworth, John (2007) A Companion to Digital Humanities. London: WileyBlackwell.




Organised by Dr David M. Berry, Department of Political and Cultural Studies, Swansea University. d.m.berry@swansea.ac.uk

A Virada Computacional nas Humanidades (The Computational Turn)

O Workshop "A Virada Computacional nas Humanidades" analisará diversas questões relacionadas ao tema da Analítica Cultural.


A Virada Computacional nas Humanidades

Onde: SWANSEA UNIVERSITY
Quando: dia 09 de Março de 2010

Keynote: N. Katherine Hayles (Professora de Literatura na Duke University).
Keynote: Lev Manovich (Professor de Artes Visuais na UCSD).

A aplicação de novas técnicas e tecnologias de visualização nas Artes e nas Humanidades resultaram em novas aproximações e metodologias para o estudo dos materiais recentes e tradicionais nessas áreas. Essa nova "revolução ou virada computacional" utiliza técnicas e métodos da ciência da computação para criar novas formas distanciadas ou aproximadas de leitura de textos (por exemplo Moretti). O workshop de um dia tem como objetivo discutir as implicações e aplicações do que Lev Manovich denominou "Analítica Cultural" e a questão de buscar padrões utilizando técnicas algorítmicas. Algumas das abordagens mais surpreendentes transformam a compreensão de textos através da utilização de análise das redes (por exemplo a teoria dos grafos), codificação de bancos de dados/XML (que achata as estruturas), ou meramente provê novas técnicas quantitativas para a observar várias formas de mídias, como filmes, para representa-las visualmente, foneticamente ou hapticamente. Nesse campo existem importantes debates sobre a diferença entre narrativa versus as técnicas dos bancos de dados, as correspondências de padrões versus a leitura hermenêutica e o paradigma estatístico (utilizando amostras) versus o paradigma de mineração (análise) de dados.

Além disso, novas formas de colaboração no âmbito da Artes e Humanidades estão emergindo, formas essas que utilizam abordagens baseadas em equipes em oposição às formas tradicionais baseadas no pesquisador solitário. Essa nova forma de pesquisa requer a habilidade de criar e de administrar equipes modulares de pesquisadoresnas áreas das Artes e Humanidades através das estruturas organizacionais providas pelas tecnologias e comunicações digitais, em conjunto com técnicas para colaboração de forma interdisciplinar com outras disciplinas, como as da ciência da computação (por exemplo a interdisciplinaridade dura contra a leve - hard interdisciplinarity versus soft interdisciplinarity).

Esperam-se artigos nas seguintes áreas:

- Leitura aberta versus atenta
- Estrutura do Banco de Dados versus Argumento
- Análise (Mineração) de Dados (Data mining)/Análise de Texto/Padrões
- Padrão como novo objeto epistemológico
- Hermenêutica e Transmissão de Dados
- Técnicas Geoespaciais
- Grandes Humanidades
- Humanidades Digitais versus Tradicionais
- Construção de Ferramentas
- Cultura Livre/Open Source Artes e Humanidades
- Colaboração, Colagens e Alianças
- Linguagem e Código (software studies)
- Visualização da Informação nas Humanidades
- Reflexões Teóricas e Filosóficas sobre a Revolução Computacional nas Humanidades

+ Requisitos para participação +

Os participantes do workshop estão convidados a apresentar um artigo propositivo (cerca de 2.000-5.000 palavras) sobre a revolução/virada computacional nas Artes e Humanidades, reflexões filosófico / teóricas sobre a revolução/virada computacional, sobre focos de investigação ou questões de pesquisa relacionadas a abordagens computacionais, propostas para a prática acadêmica com técnicas de visualização algorítmica, propostas de novos métodos de investigação no que diz respeito às artes e humanidades ou estudos de casos específicos (se aplicável) e os resultados obtidos até o presente momento. Os artigos serão publicados em PDF no website do workshop e alguns dos participantes serão convidados a apresentar seu trabalho presencialmente.

Deadline para envio dos artigos: 10 de Fevereiro de 2010
Envio dos artigos: http://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=tct2010

O Workshop tem o apoio do Callaghan Centre for the Study of Conflict, Power, Empire, Swansea University e do Research Institute in the Arts and Humanities (RIAH) at Swansea University.

+ Referências Bibliográficas +

Clement, Tanya E. (2008) ‘A thing not beginning and not ending’: using digital tools to distant-read Gertrude Stein’s The Making of Americans. Literary and Linguistic Computing. 23.3 (2008): 361.

Clement, Tanya, Steger, Sara, Unsworth, John, Uszkalo, Kirsten (2008) How Not to Read a Million Books. Retrieved 10/11/09 from http://www3.isrl.illinois.edu/~unsworth/hownot2read.html

Council on Library and Information Resources and The National Endowment for the Humanities (2009) Working Together or Apart: Promoting the Next Generation of Digital Scholarship. Retrieved 10/11/09 from http://www.clir.org/pubs/reports/pub145/pub145.pdf

Hayles, N. Katherine (2009) RFID: Human Agency and Meaning in Information-Intensive Environments. Theory, Culture and Society 26.2/3 (2009): 1-24.

Hayles, N. Katherine (2009) How We Think: The Transforming Power of Digital Technologies. Retrieved 10/11/09 from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/27680

Kittler, Fredrich (1997) Literature, Media, Information Systems. London: Routledge.

Krakauer, David C. (2007) The Quest for Patterns in Meta-History. Santa Fe Institute Bulletin. Winter 2007. Retrieved 10/11/09 from http://www.intelros.ru/pdf/SFI_Bulletin/Quest.pdf

Latour, Bruno (2007) Reassembling the Social. London: Oxford University Press.

Manovich, Lev (2002) The Language of New Media. MIT Press.

Manovich, Lev (2007) White paper: Cultural Analytics: Analysis and Visualizations of Large Cultural Data Sets, May 2007. Retrieved 10/11/09 from http://softwarestudies.com/cultural_analytics/cultural_analytics_2008.doc

McLemee, Scott (2006) Literature to Infinity. Inside Higher Ed. Retrieved 10/11/09 from http://www.insidehighered.com/views/mclemee/mclemee193

Moretti, Franco (2005) Graphs, Maps, Trees: Abstract Models for a Literary History. London: Verso.

Robinson, Peter (2006) Electronic Textual Editing: The Canterbury Tales and other Medieval Texts. Electronic Textual Editing. Modern Language Association of America. Retrieved 10/11/09 from http://www.tei-c.org/About/Archive_new/ETE/Preview/robinson.xml

Schreibman, Susan, Siemens, Ray & Unsworth, John (2007) A Companion to Digital Humanities. London: WileyBlackwell.




Organizado pelo Dr. David M. Berry, Departamento de Estudos Políticos e Culturais da Swansea University. Contato: d.m.berry@swansea.ac.uk

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